New entries in the OED: March 2020

What are the latest entries to the OED in March 2020, and what do they mean? How do words get into the OED? 

26 March 2020 by Laura Kelly

5 Shakespearean words we should use more often

You might be surprised about how many everyday words and phrases come from Shakespeare. But what about the less common words?

3 December 2019 by Laura Kelly

Watch your tone – how to write content that connects

We all know the phrase: “It’s not what you say, it’s the way you say it.” How can you connect to your reader on a personal level?

5 August 2019 by Laura Kelly

Readability at the UN: why is speech clarity important?

Readability is of great importance when writing speeches and communicating with others. How are the principles of readability used at the UN?

23 April 2019 by Laura Kelly

The Fry readability graph

The Fry formula is one of several developed in the 1960s for speed and efficiency. Find out how this graph can help you improve your readability.

8 April 2019 by Laura Kelly

The IELTS test

IELTS is a standardised proficiency test. It can be used to reach a global audience. Find out how IELTS is calculated and how you can best use it. 

1 April 2019 by Laura Kelly

The Powers Sumner Kearl formula

The Powers Sumner Kearl formula was developed in the 1950s by a group of readability experts. Find out how you can use it to improve your writing. 

27 March 2019 by Laura Kelly

The Raygor readability graph

The Raygor readability graph is a formula which calculates the reading grade level of a text. Find out how it's calculated and how it can best be used.

25 March 2019 by Laura Kelly

The history of readability

Readability has evolved with language. It is also linked to consumer habits, tech and education. Find out more about the history of readability. 

4 March 2019 by Laura Kelly

Do Inuits really have 50 words for snow?

The belief that the Inuit have dozens of different words for snow has become a widely known piece of linguistic trivia. But, where did this belief come from, and how close is it to the truth?

8 February 2019 by Laura Kelly

British Forces think acronyms are FUBAR

The British Forces are going to war with acronyms. The defense minister, Stuart Andrew, has banned the use of acronyms and abbreviations in his office. Smart move, or will it all go FUBAR?

25 October 2018 by Steve Linney

How to swear like the old days

Modern English lets us down when it comes to swearing. What words from old English can bring back the shock factor?

31 August 2018 by Steve Linney