How to choose the right readability formula

When it comes to measuring readability, there are a whole variety of readability tests. You could go for the long established Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease or the later Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level. But what about the Gunning-Fog and the New Dale-Chall?

4 April 2017 by Ruth Colmer

Readability and the Gunning Fog Index

The Gunning Fog index, created in 1944, is a commonly cited readability scoring formula. But, what do the scores mean? How did the formula come about? And when is the test most useful?

27 March 2017 by Ruth Colmer

Death by (poor) readability

At least 6 out of 10 US adults who have internet access use the internet to look up health information. We are all self-diagnosing, self-prescribing and generally bypassing a visit to the GP in exchange for a quick search on Google. And it’s not just the internet where we get acquainted with health advice.

27 March 2017 by Ruth Colmer

Spache readability formula word list

The Spache readability formula, much like the New Dale-Chall Readability Formula, uses a set of words which are familiar to students to calculate the readability of text.

24 March 2017 by Dave Child

Mistakes were made: understanding passive voice

Listen to someone trying to explain a high-profile error, and you’ll probably hear them say something like “Mistakes were made in carrying out the plan” or “The wrong envelope was given to the presenter.”

12 March 2017 by Dave Child

The Flesch Reading Ease and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level

Flesch readability scores are the most used and trusted of all readability scoring formula. But, what actually are the Flesch and Flesch-Kincaid readability scores? And what do the scores really mean? What is a Flesch Reading Ease score? In the late forties, Rudolph Flesch was a consultant with the Associated Press, developing methods for improving […]

26 January 2017 by Steve Linney